Tagged: rolling admissions

Rolling Admissions

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As you well know, many schools have January 1st deadlines for submission of applications. However, the fact that that deadline has come and gone does not mean that it’s the end of the college application season! Quite the opposite is true, and this is due to a little something known as rolling admissions. Rolling admissions is a policy whereby colleges/universities will accept applications at any time, up until a final deadline OR until all of their available spots are full – the window for applying is usually more than six months long. One great advantage for students of applying via rolling admissions is that they should hear soon after submitting their application whether they’ve been accepted, and won’t have to wait until March or April for a response. Know also that Admitster is here to help, and we’ve compiled a list of schools, by state, that offer rolling admissions policies – just click here to learn more about your rolling admissions application options!

Rolling Admissions

 

If you intend to apply to schools via rolling admissions, I recommend that you still try to submit your application sooner rather than later.  Yes, there may be no strict deadline (or a deadline that is still months away) but keep in mind that you don’t want to risk waiting too long to apply, only to discover that all of the spots have been filled! Also, schools may offer financial aid and accommodation on a first-come-first-serve basis, and you want to ensure that you have access to those resources.  In short, and as ever, plan accordingly. Take the necessary steps to apply as early as possible, doing what needs to be done in order to roll out your rolling admissions applications!

 

Rolling, Rolling, Rolling…

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An earlier Admitster blog post touched briefly on the topic of rolling admissions.  In that post, the term “rolling admissions” was defined as a policy whereby colleges/universities will accept applications at any time, up until a final deadline OR until all of their available spots are full – the window for applying is usually more than six months long.  An advantage for students applying via rolling admissions is that they should hear soon after submitting their application whether they’ve been accepted, and won’t have to wait until March or April for a response.  That, my dear readers, is rolling admissions in a nutshell.  However, today I intend to explore the rolling admissions phenomenon in greater detail.

Final Rolling Stone

 

In terms of these considerations, where can you begin?  For instance, how can you easily determine which colleges and universities even accept applications on a rolling basis?  As a starting point, you can take a look at those schools that accept The Common Application (and note to self, The 2015-2016 Common Application is now available!).  Click on this page and you’ll be provided with information on the types of admissions options offered by each school (in terms of rolling admissions, early action, early decision, and regular admissions) and their specific deadlines. Niche.com has also compiled a comprehensive list of schools offering rolling admissions – click here. Another resource comes in the form of this article from U.S. News & World Report, entitled “Highest-Ranked Schools With Rolling Admissions.”  This piece informs us that of the 268 ranked national universities, 79 offer rolling admissions.  We are then provided with a list of the top-ranked schools in this category, for instance, Penn State and The University of Minnesota.  Be aware, however, that Penn State has a November 30th priority deadline and that, in the case of The University of Minnesota, “applications received or completed after the December 15th priority deadline will be reviewed on a space-available basis.”

This brings me to my final point, namely that if you intend to apply to schools that offer a rolling admissions option, I recommend that you still try to submit your application sooner rather than later.  Yes, there may be no strict deadline (or a deadline that is still months away) but keep in mind that you don’t want to risk waiting too long to apply, only to discover that all of the spots have been filled!  Also, schools may offer financial aid and accommodation on a first-come-first-serve basis, and you want to ensure that you have access to those resources.  In short, and as ever, plan accordingly. Take the necessary steps to apply early, doing what needs to be done in order to get the ball rolling on your rolling admissions applications!

(Early) Enough To Make Your Head Spin!

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time3Early action, early decision, rolling admissions, regular admissions – it’s enough to make your head spin! Like so many things in life, success in the college admissions process depends, at least in part, on timing. Not only do you have to ensure that you don’t miss deadlines along the way (e.g. for standardized testing or deadlines related to financing your college education), but you also need to give thought to your college admissions strategy as it relates to the timing of your applications.

Here is a very brief run-down of your options:

Early Action – Students applying to a school using the early action option will usually submit their completed applications by mid-November and hear back from colleges by January. However, being accepted via early action does not commit the applicant to that particular college or university, and students usually don’t need to inform the college of whether to expect them at orientation or not until May 1st. It’s also nice to know that you can apply via early action to more than one school.

Early Decision – As is the case with early action, an early decision applicant applies to his/her dream college in the fall. However, there are crucial differences to note between early action and early decision! To begin with, you can only apply to one school using the early decision option, and you should only apply to this one school if you really, and I mean really, want to go there, because if you’re accepted then you’ve already committed yourself to attending. In short, if you’ve gotten down on one knee, proposed, and the school responded (usually by December) saying, “Yes! Yes!  A thousand times, yes!“, then it’s time to plan the wedding.

Rolling Admissions – A college with a rolling admissions policy will accept applications at any time, up until a final deadline. An advantage for students of applying via rolling admissions is that they should hear soon after submitting their application whether they’ve been accepted, and won’t have to wait until March or April for a response.

Regular Admissions – With this option, you decide to apply to a college by meeting its regular, normal, good ol’ fashioned admissions deadline.

A future post will consider the pros and cons of these different strategies, but for now know that not every college offers these options, so do your research. “Where should I begin?”, you may ask, perhaps feeling a bit overwhelmed. An excellent starting point would be to take a closer look at the colleges (and there are over 500 of them) that accept the Common Application. Check out this page for a list of schools, which types of admissions options they offer, and what their specific deadlines are. Yes, your head may be spinning but there’s a simple way to calm the vertigo and get your feet more firmly planted on the ground – plan ahead! I suggest the following:

Buy a calendar.  Write important deadlines on that calendar.  Update that calendar frequently.

Whatever your strategy turns out to be (early action, early decision, regular admissions), the deadlines are crucial. Put them on your shiny, new calendar.  Use red ink.

Whether you are a natural planner or need to force yourself to go out and buy that calendar, being as organized as possible throughout the process is truly the best way to keep yourself from feeling completely overwhelmed, to keep your head from spinning.