Tagged: NCAA

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For those of you thinking about playing your high school sport(s) in college, I thought a post with information about the NCAA would be useful.  To begin with, “NCAA” stands for National Collegiate Athletic Association.  This is their website – http://www.ncaa.org/

The NCAA was founded in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt organized two conferences of collegiate athletic leaders for the purpose of “protecting young people from the dangerous and exploitative athletics practices of the time.”  It wasn’t until 1973, however, that the different divisions within the NCAA were established.  These divisions are the aptly-named Division I, Division II, and Division III.

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Different NCAA rules govern each division…

Division I

  • Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics.
  • These schools can offer scholarships to their student athletes.
  • In general, larger schools (in terms of the number of students) compete in this division.
  • These schools generally have larger athletic budgets than Division II and Division III schools – the generous athletic budgets are due, in part, to established media contracts to cover the Division I conferences.
  • As the NCAA states on their website, “With nearly 350 colleges and universities in its membership, Division I schools field more than 6,000 athletic teams, providing opportunities for more than 170,000 student-athletes to compete in NCAA sports each year.”

Division II

  • Division II is the intermediate level of intercollegiate athletics.
  • These schools can offer scholarships to their student athletes.
  • In general, smaller schools (in terms of the number of students) compete in this division.
  • As the NCAA states on their website, “Division II is a collection of 300 NCAA colleges and universities that provide thousands of student-athletes the opportunity to compete at a high level of scholarship athletics while excelling in the classroom and fully engaging in the broader campus experience.”

Division III

  • These schools can NOT offer scholarships to their student athletes.
  • In general, smaller schools (in terms of the number of students) compete in this division.
  • Student athletes at Division III schools generally focus more on academics than athletics.
  • As the NCAA states on their website, “More than 180,000 student-athletes at 450 institutions make up Division III, the largest NCAA division both in number of participants and number of schools.”
  • Click here for more information on becoming a Division III student athlete.

Today, around 1,100 colleges and universities are NCAA members – click here to see if the schools you’re interested in are affiliated with the NCAA.  As I wrote in an earlier post, being a student athlete is truly a wonderful experience and worthy of your consideration!